A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

From the desk of The Movie Snob.

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night  (B-).  Somehow I missed this 2014 black & white foreign-language vampire flick during its original release, but happily a friend invited me to a special showing last night at the Alamo Drafthouse.  (Actually I tried to talk her into seeing Logan instead, but she wasn’t having it.  She’s been a big vampire fan ever since New Moon.)  It’s a weird movie, but interesting.  Our hero is some ordinary guy living in a bleak industrial town called Bad City.  His father is a junkie, and a drug dealer takes our hero’s beloved car because dad can’t pay his debts.  Then the drug dealer abuses a prostitute who works for him.  This draws the ire of our vampire (Sheila Vand, Argo), an ordinary-seeming woman who ghosts around town at night and can sprout fangs in a jiffy.  Later she menaces a little boy and takes his skateboard.  After that she meets our hero after he has gone to a costume party (as Dracula!), and instead of making a meal out of him she actually seems to start liking him.  But you’re never really sure if she’s eventually going to chomp on him or not; her affect is pretty flat.  More stuff happens after that, in a slow, moody, artsy kind of way.  It held my interest.

(I’m categorizing it as a foreign film because it’s in Farsi, but I have read that it was actually shot in California.  The director, Ana Lily Amirpour, is Iranian-American.)

This was my first trip to an Alamo Drafthouse, and it was a pretty interesting experience.  We got to our theater pretty early, and before getting to the real previews they showed a bunch of film clips and trailers from cheesy old horror movies back-to-back.  It was fine to set the mood, I guess, but it made conversation difficult.  I got food, which I seldom do at movie theaters, and got a mediocre Royale Burger with Cheese and some cold fries out of the deal.  The seats were comfy, though.

The Salesman

New from the desk of The Movie Snob.

The Salesman  (B-).  This is the new (Oscar©-nominated) movie by Iranian director Asghar Farhadi.  I liked his 2011 film A Separation, and I really liked his 2013 film The Past, so I was looking forward to The Salesman quite a bit.  Suffice to say, it is my least favorite of his films, but it’s still an interesting look at life in contemporary Iran.  Emad and Rana are a happily married couple who unexpectedly find themselves having to move in a hurry when their apartment building threatens to collapse.  A friend offers them a place, but it comes with some baggage—the previous tenant was a woman of doubtful virtue, and she has refused to come back and collect most of her stuff.  Short of options, Emad and Rana take the place.  Then someone—one of the previous tenant’s clients?—enters the apartment and attacks Rana.  Everyone agrees that going to the police would be pointless and would only expose Rana to a lot of painful scrutiny.  So Emad does his own sleuthing to try to find the culprit.  I just didn’t find the story as compelling as Farhadi’s previous films.  I may have missed some of Farhadi’s message because I am not familiar with the Arthur Miller play Death of a Salesman, which gives the movie its title and plays a significant role in the story.  Anyway, it’s worth seeing, but I encourage you to see The Past instead if your taste for subtitled Iranian films is limited.

The Innocents

A new review from The Movie Snob.

The Innocents  (A-).  This French-Polish co-production, which is based on true events, packs a powerful punch.  It’s December 1945.  A young nun sneaks out of a little Catholic convent in the Polish countryside and hurries to the nearest town, desperately seeking a doctor–and one, she insists, who is neither Polish nor Russian.  Against all odds, she finds a young French doctor named Mathilde who is willing to leave her Red Cross station and visit the convent.  Mathilde is shocked at what she finds there: seven pregnant nuns.  When the Soviet Army “liberated” Poland several months earlier, the marauding soldiers invaded the convent and raped the nuns.  Now, the nuns who conceived are reaching full term.  And no one outside the convent can know, or else the the convent will be shuttered and the women shunned in society as disgraced.  It’s a horrible situation, and still more horrible things happen as Mathilde tries to help the nuns in their hour of crisis.  There are a few happy moments, and Mathilde strikes up an unlikely friendship with Maria, the second-in-command at the convent, but the movie is largely bleak and upsetting.  Still, I found it a compelling cinematic experience.  But please do exercise discretion in deciding whether to see this movie, especially if scenes depicting sexual assault are triggering for you.

If you like this movie, I encourage you to look up Ida, a Polish movie from a couple of years ago, focusing on a single Polish nun discovering some family secrets going back to WWII.  Also, A Woman in Berlin, another based-on-a-true-story movie, about the fall of Berlin at the end of WWII and the fate of the ordinary Germans who lived there when the Soviets arrived.

A Bigger Splash

From the desk of The Movie Snob.

A Bigger Splash  (C-).  Or perhaps more aptly, Lifestyles of the Rich and Decadent.  Tilda Swinton (Only Lovers Left Alive) stars as Marianne Lane, a big rock-n-roll star who is vacationing on a remote Italian island with her lover Paul (Matthias Schoenaerts, Black Book) after surgery on her vocal cords.  Their quiet interlude is shattered by the unexpected arrival of Marianne’s former lover, manic record producer Harry Hawkes (Ralph Fiennes, Hail, Caesar!) and his 22-year-old daughter Penelope (Dakota Johnson, How to Be Single).  Sexual tension runs in all sorts of directions as the quartet drink in the Mediterranean sunshine and, of course, large amounts of alcohol.  Watchable, but it didn’t really seem to add up to much.

The Lobster

A new review from The Movie Snob.

The Lobster  (C-).  This movie has too much critical buzz–and sounded just too weird–for me to miss.  It’s an allegory or satire or something about the pressure society puts on people to pair off romantically.  In the alternative universe of The Lobster, everyone has to pair off.  If your partner leaves you for another person, you get shipped off to a hotel where you can mingle with loads of other single people.  And if you don’t find a partner within 45 days, you get turned into the animal of your choice and set free.  Remember, I said it was weird.  Anyhoo, Colin Ferrell (Total Recall) is our guide to this insane asylum.  He lands in the hotel at the very beginning of the movie, where he sort-of befriends a guy with a limp (Ben Whishaw, Spectre) and a guy with a lisp (John C. Reilly, Chicago).  Some hotel residents desperately want to find someone, while others seem more or less resigned to their fate.  Oh, and there’s a band of “Loners” (including Léa Seydoux, Spectre, and Rachel Weisz, Agora) running around out in the woods around the hotel–defiantly (and illegally) single people who have their own weird code of conduct about relationships.  What will Ferrell do?  Seek love, join the Loners, or settle for becoming a lobster?  It’s all very weird and artificial and sort of interesting, but I really can’t say I really enjoyed it all that much.

The Lady in the Van

A new review from The Movie Snob.

The Lady in the Van  (B).  The redoubtable Maggie Smith (TV’s Downton Abbey) stars in the title role in this British import.  An introverted playwright named Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings, The Queen) has bought a townhouse, and he soon meets neighborhood fixture Miss Shepherd (Smith).  She’s an eccentric, excitable, and malodorous homeless woman who lives in a decrepit old van that she occasionally moves up or down the street.  The neighbors, being normal people, don’t really want her around, but, also being liberals, they can’t bear to run her off either.  Somehow she eventually gets Bennett to let her park in his driveway, and there she stays–for the next 15 years.  And apparently this is based on a true story!  We get bits and pieces of Miss Shepherd’s backstory, which, as to be expected, is not a particularly happy one.  Good performances, but the story is a bit slight and certainly a bit sad.

45 Years

The Movie Snob is impressed.

45 Years  (A-).  I didn’t see Room, so I can’t say Brie Larson didn’t deserve the Academy Award for best actress this year.  But I must say that Charlotte Rampling’s performance in this quiet, understated British drama is one of the best I have seen in a long while.  Rampling (Swimming Pool) plays Kate, a British woman who is only six days away from a big party celebrating the 45th anniversary of her wedding to Geoff (Tom Courtenay, Doctor Zhivago).  But then a letter arrives from Switzerland.  The body of Katya, Geoff’s girlfriend before he met Kate, has been found.  Kate knew about Katya, and that she had died (and disappeared) in a tragic accident while she and Geoff were hiking through the Alps.  But the news hits Geoff harder than seems entirely reasonable, and both he and Kate are increasingly distressed as their anniversary party relentlessly approaches.  If you like dramas with no lasers or zombies, this is the movie for you.